A cancer diagnosis can send anyone reeling with panic. Families are sent into a tailspin, awaiting the prognosis. A significant portion of cancer research focuses on the treatment of adults, yielding amazing results. However, the same advances for children have been stonewalled.

The federal governments allots a certain amount of money to cancer research each year.  The National Cancer Institute  is the government’s primary agency in all things cancer related. The NCI’s budget for 2017 hovers just over $5.3 Billion; this figure seems promising.

The Truth 365, a documentary and social media campaign that strives to raise visibility to the issue of childhood cancer, highlights the motivation for their work.

Cancer kills more than 2,500 children in our country every year. Over 13,500 kids will be diagnosed with cancer in the next 365 days. Though these numbers are significant, the potential market is too small to attract the attention of private industry. This makes the role of the taxpayer-funded National Cancer Institute (NCI) especially critical yet approximately 4% percent of its annual budget is dedicated to childhood cancer.

Just 4% of research funds are dedicated to saving the lives of thousands of children. These inadequate funds are the roadblocks resulting in antiquated treatments and painful deaths. That should hardly be a reality, with the incredible medical technology available today.

Several organizations and social media pages have done their due diligence to raise awareness for childhood cancer and help families in need. Popular organizations such as St. Jude Children’s Hospital and the Ronald McDonald House exist primarily to help the families of sick children get care. The Instagram page, Childhood Cancer Warriors,  puts a spotlight on specific cases and helps raise money. While efforts are made daily, childhood cancer is sadly, not a national concern.

Cancer in any capacity is devastating, it is especially so in children. The campaign to raise the percentage of federal dollars for research has already begun. Private organizations and fundraisers are leading the charge for families that are looking for answers for their child’s condition.  With the help of the public, the hope is to make the life of a child worth #morethan4.