The Suicide Machine Aims to Make Death Peaceful

Death means different things to people across cultures and religions. The idea that everyone has a last day is non-disputable. Assisted Suicide gives death a permanent and scheduled date. Although questionable, physician assisted deaths are not new.

This type of death was highlighted in mainstream media through Dr. Kevorkian. He was a medical pathologist that helped terminally ill patients end their lives and was eventually prosecuted for it. In an interview with the New York Times he explained his position:

“My ultimate aim is to make euthanasia a positive experience,” he said. “I’m trying to knock the medical profession into accepting its responsibilities, and those responsibilities include assisting their patients with death.”

The argument for assisted suicide is centered around giving the terminally ill individuals who want to end their suffering a peaceful and dignified way to do it. Philip Nitschke, a pro- euthanasia activist has developed a 3-D printed device to do just that. The Sarcos is a pod where the patient can end their own lives with nitrogen. Nitschke is a staunch supporter of an individuals write to choose.

I believe it is a fundamental human right for every adult of sound mind, to be able to plan for the end of their life in a way that is reliable, peaceful & at a time of their choosing.

Several states such as: Vermont, California and Oregon  already permit assisted suicide for patients that have 6 months or less to live. This device may give individuals more autonomy over their own deaths. The legality and the logistics of how a product like this would actually be put into practice has yet to be determined.

The morality of self inflicted death is still up for debate; individuals such as Nitschke are using modern medicine to make the transition between life and death more dignified.

Daily Inspiration: Cancer Survivor Becomes Stoma Designer

Heather Maston is a stage three colon survivor who discovered how to make her new disability work for her. After having her large intestines and rectum removed, she now has a permanent ostomy bag on her body.

To help her cope with this new accessory she designed covers for the bag that she wears daily. She can switch them up depending on her mood, and help her bring a sense of confidence to her adjusted daily routine.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=993070387509997&id=276157035868006

 

Adaptive Clothing Breaks the Mold

The greatest features of modern society are tolerance and innovation. Thanks to this, people are finally able to reap the benefits of progressive thinking. Adaptive clothing is specifically designed to increase mobility for disabled, elderly and special-needs children and adults.

While sneakers with Velcro clasps and ‘grandma’ pants with elastic waists aren’t new, this concept goes a step beyond. Magnetic closures, sensory friendly and anti-strip jumpsuits for Alzheimer’s sufferers is now available. Individuals who are wheelchair bound are able to find clothing that is suitable for their lifestyle.

A quick search yields large and small retailers that have expanded their fashion lines to help these previously excluded groups. Tommy Hilfiger, Target, and Silvert’s are just a few of the brands that are enabling people to increase their independence.

Adaptive clothing is ushering in a new wave of fashion and accessibility. Allowing someone to maintain a sense of normalcy in what can otherwise be a restrictive existence, is life altering. The future of all inclusive garments will only help foster individuality and improve the lives of those who need it most.

 

Daily Inspiration: Father Hears Daughter’s Donated Heart

Bill Conner was reunited with his daughter in a very special away. She passed away suddenly on a family vacation and her parents decided to donate her organs.

During a 2000 mile journey to bring awareness to organ donation, he met the recipient of his daughter’s heart.

Losing a loved one is very difficult. Donating organs can be a way to commemorate a life, by saving another.

If you are interested in organ donation. Please visit U.S. Government Information On Organ Donation and Transplantation.

You can sign up through the Organ Donation Registry or through your state’s DMV.

Daily Inspiration: Spread Valentine’s Day Love

Today you can be the inspiration for a child in need. Children’s hospitals are accepting well wishes on free e-cards for sick patients this Valentine’s Day.

Help bring joy and love to their little hearts.

Here are some hospitals participating this Valentine’s Day:

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

St. Jude’s Research Hospital

Boston Children’s Hospital Trust

Arkansas Children’s

C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

Convenience To Contraceptives On Campus

It is not a secret that young adults attending college are sexually active. Even though the media has evolved to be extremely sex ‘forward’, the topic of sex is still taboo.

Women and men may still face scrutiny and some colleges are looking to ease that burden; with contraceptive vending machines. Since 2012, Shippensburg University, University of California, Santa Barbara and University of California, Davis have installed ‘wellness’ machines on campus.

Health education programs in high schools vary widely across America. They employ conservative or progressive curricula to inform students about sex. By the time these students get to college, their experiences are different.

Wellness machines provide condoms, Plan B, and pregnancy tests for the convenience of all students. Ultimately, making it a great resource for reserved and liberal students who are engaging in sexual activity to stay safe without judgement.

Earlier this month, Stanford University became the latest school to install these vending machines.  According to an article by the New York Times, more schools are looking to provide these services.

Parteek Singh, a recent graduate who urged U.C. Davis to install the machine, said he had heard from people at more than 30 schools who are interested in learning how to do the same thing on their campuses.

“This will be big,” Mr. Singh said. “It’s just the beginning.”

This appears to be a new trend for schools that are looking to turn this taboo topic into new and improved health services for their students.

Regret In Everyday Life

Life is all about experience. Each day brings new situations, where we must make choices. In these decisions- we are eventually bound to fall short.

Mistakes will be made– tests can be failed or we have lapses in judgement. It is inevitable that regrets will exist.

The emotion of regret is explored in the podcast, “Regrets, I Have A Few“, by Hidden Brain. Regret can be defined as a ruminative thought, an obsession about an event in the past. Some events can be so intrusive that it leads to anxiety and depression.

https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550249439/550260483

The most important part of a regret, is understanding how and why it affects you. Analyzing the context surrounding these experiences can prove to be hopeful. Learning about the different types of regret is among the valuable information found in this episode.

Even though regret is the second most common emotion experienced, it doesn’t have to serve only as a negative pillar in the mind.

Childhood Cancer: More Than 4

A cancer diagnosis can send anyone reeling with panic. Families are sent into a tailspin, awaiting the prognosis. A significant portion of cancer research focuses on the treatment of adults, yielding amazing results. However, the same advances for children have been stonewalled.

The federal governments allots a certain amount of money to cancer research each year.  The National Cancer Institute  is the government’s primary agency in all things cancer related. The NCI’s budget for 2017 hovers just over $5.3 Billion; this figure seems promising.

The Truth 365, a documentary and social media campaign that strives to raise visibility to the issue of childhood cancer, highlights the motivation for their work.

Cancer kills more than 2,500 children in our country every year. Over 13,500 kids will be diagnosed with cancer in the next 365 days. Though these numbers are significant, the potential market is too small to attract the attention of private industry. This makes the role of the taxpayer-funded National Cancer Institute (NCI) especially critical yet approximately 4% percent of its annual budget is dedicated to childhood cancer.

Just 4% of research funds are dedicated to saving the lives of thousands of children. These inadequate funds are the roadblocks resulting in antiquated treatments and painful deaths. That should hardly be a reality, with the incredible medical technology available today.

Several organizations and social media pages have done their due diligence to raise awareness for childhood cancer and help families in need. Popular organizations such as St. Jude Children’s Hospital and the Ronald McDonald House exist primarily to help the families of sick children get care. The Instagram page, Childhood Cancer Warriors,  puts a spotlight on specific cases and helps raise money. While efforts are made daily, childhood cancer is sadly, not a national concern.

Cancer in any capacity is devastating, it is especially so in children. The campaign to raise the percentage of federal dollars for research has already begun. Private organizations and fundraisers are leading the charge for families that are looking for answers for their child’s condition.  With the help of the public, the hope is to make the life of a child worth #morethan4.